Saturday, August 22, 2015

Snap, Crackle, Pop, Good Morning

Not often you hear the Rolling Stones sing a jingle.  But here are Mick and the boys for Rice Krispies.   Maybe it should be SNAP, CRACK, SNORT.

Or  SNAP, CRACKLE, OW!  Here's TV's "Walter White" for Preparation H...

And if we're doing celebrity commercials, how can I not feature you-know-who?

16 comments:

Bill Avena said...

I like Carlin's "snap crackle fuck you."

Igor said...

What's the deal there with Natalie's teeth? They look terrible.

Peter said...

When it comes to celebrity commercials, nothing will ever beat the Arnold Schwarzenegger Japanese energy drink commercials from the 90s for hilarity.

This is just one of them.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRLe826lyao

For the most crass sellout to make a quick buck, Michael Jackson's willingness to bastardise his own songs for a Pepsi commercial was quite something. Without any shame he sang special versions of Billie Jean and Bad, substituting the original lyrics with lines like "It's the choice of a new generation" and "You know I'm bad, and Pepsi's cool." To be fair, he needed the dough. All those facelifts weren't cheap.

ODJennings said...

Thanks Ken, now YouTube's "Recommended for you" is suggesting I watch all manner of educational videos on the prevention and treatment of hemorrhoids.

Couldn't have been Natalie Wood videos, had to be hemorrhoids . . .

SharoneRosen said...

just something disturbing about a dead woman saying, "it's the last lotion you'll ever try." The last... the very last...

H Johnson said...

Nah... any thought of Natalie Wood and lotion is alright with me.

Aloha

LouOCNY said...

In spite of the references to it in various places being done in 1964, the Stones' Rice Crispies (as its spelled in the UK) gig happened VERY early on in their career in mid-1963, right after their first UK single had been released. Instead of it being a money grab, its more like an up and coming group with a hustling manager pulling off a real coup.

MAD MEN got it right though - they had the episode set in 1966 where they had the idea of The Stones doing a Heinz spot - "Heinz is on My Side" - mentioning the Rice Krispies spot 'three years ago'.

Anonymous said...

Jerry Lewis ?

Peter said...

Greatest Ever Sitcoms was shown on UK TV again yesterday. I missed it first time round. It was fun seeing you talk about Cheers, Frasier and MASH. I'd forgotten that Cheers was beaten in the ratings in the beginning by a show called Tucker's Witch.

VP81955 said...

In spite of the references to it in various places being done in 1964, the Stones' Rice Crispies (as its spelled in the UK) gig happened VERY early on in their career in mid-1963, right after their first UK single had been released. Instead of it being a money grab, its more like an up and coming group with a hustling manager pulling off a real coup.

Or at the time, Kellogg's either couldn't work out a deal with Brian Epstein for the Beatles -- this was just before "She Loves You" cemented UK Beatlemania -- or the corporate folks simply deemed them too Liverpudlian.

John Doe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jay Walker said...

Then there's always that little ear worm from the Monkees. K-E-DOUBLE L-OH-DOUBLE GOOD KELLOGG'S BEST TO YOU... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7Vh-h2Gu00

Scott L. said...

Radio geek alert, the voice-over in the Natalie Wood spot was Dan Ingram.

Brian Phillips said...

I've known about the Rolling Stones ad for some time. I like to mention it when people get heated about how real rock 'n' rollers never do advertisements and commercialization is a credibility-killer.

The expanded version of "The Who Sell Out", features a few jingles for the John Mason car dealership, which was a real car dealership, as well as a very tuneful ad for Jaguar.

We can also add Cream (Falstaff)
Ray Charles (Coca-Cola AND Pepsi)


I'm not saying that it is an absolute requirement that musicians do ad work, but I don't think that the status of any of these acts has been diminished because of the above.

I do "wonder" what folks were thinking when they allowed this:

http://monkeygoggles.com/?p=1358

Jay Walker said...

I loved all the Coca-Cola "artist" Jingles. Beginning in 1965 the "who's who" of pop music recorded Coke jingles, each in a groups unique style, Ray Charles, Shirelles, Four seasons, Moody Blues, in total over 100 artists/groups...

VP81955 said...

One of the Everly Brothers' box set compilations has Don and Phil singing for Coke in 1964, when many British acts they inspired were ruling the charts, leaving hardly any room for the originals -- although "Gone, Gone, Gone" made the lower reaches of the Top 40 that fall, and the brothers made many other fine mid-sixties sides hardly anyone paid attention to.