Wednesday, August 08, 2012

Why Vin Scully is so great

Just a typical Vin Scully broadcast. This was from a Dodger-Rockies game earlier this week. Even if you're not a baseball fan, watch this. Tell me you're not entranced by how masterful he is describing this situation.

28 comments:

Anonymous said...

That's the master at work. Long live Vin the artist.

Great Big Radio Guy said...

A national treasure AND an outstanding lip reader. That's our Vin!

Bob Claster said...

I've always thought that Vin was good on TV but was at his best on the radio. I miss that.

Don K. said...

Even though I'm a life-long Cub fan, we call him the Voice of God at our house. I grew up with Jack Brickhouse, loved to party with Harry Caray, but there has never been anyone better at calling a baseball game than Vin Scully. Nor will there ever be.

The Mutt said...

What is it about baseball announcing and acting that makes guys never, ever want to retire?

Vin and Clint Eastwood are still at the top of their game, but they are, no offense, really old! They seem way too smart to have blown their money, so it can't be need. They could be enjoying their favorite hobby in the most luxurious surroundings imaginable.

Getting paid to watch baseball is awesome, but the travel and the dealing with networks and such can't be fun.

Acting is the most fun I ever have, but BEING and actor pretty much sucks. If you are struggling, it is constant fear and humiliation. If you hit it big, you have no normal life.

Don't these guys want to kick back and go fishing?

Jake Mabe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jake Mabe said...

Exhibit A as to why Vinny's the greatest baseball announcer who ever lived...he didn't earn that moniker for nothin'...

Eileen K. said...

Blinkin' fertilizer. Love it.

Anonymous said...

Makes me really miss Dave Niehaus and wish he didn't have a color guy all those years.

chas said...

I make an effort to watch every game Vin broadcasts for the Dodgers. He really is a master. The best characteristic of his call, which is evident here, is his willingness to be silent and let the fans watch what is happening without over describing the action. He's a national treasure.

Mike Heath said...

Nobody better and more classy than Vinny. A genuine great guy.

Breadbaker said...

A clinic.

David Whitham said...

Vin Scully, American Treasure. I don't think much more needs to be said.

micncue said...

i hate the dodgers. why? giants fan, here. 'nuf said. i hate them as much as i love vin scully. nobody paints a picture better than he. and he doesn't need a sidekick to help out, thank you very much. i have mlb xtra innings, and i hate it when the dogs are on kcal. no vin. and no vin on the road, other than west coast. but when he's on the air, i've got the wireless headphones as i walk around the house. you don't even need to watch TV. he tells the story so well. thank you, vin. "good night everybody."

Barefoot Billy Aloha said...

Sometimes I don't get it:

In the all of the history of baseball, has there ever been one argument from a manager that ever forced the ump to reverse a call?

If so, what'd he say? "I've got pictures of you with a duck and monkey?"

That's the only statement I can think of that'd work.

Ken? Did a reversal ever happen because of what the manager said?

Michael said...

Barefoot Billy, believe it or not, sometimes the umpire changes the call because he does realize he got it wrong. Although Mattingly may have a future as a lawyer.

The Vin has done things like this. Lasorda is so voluble, and Vin would describe him, saying, "He dangles a participle, he splits an infinitive."

benson said...

Yes about Scully.

But about the play itself, that's a very close call. I can make a credible argument to both the ball being trapped and being caught. And Scully made another great point. Umps have to call that in real time.

Loved the blinkin' fertilizer, too.

Bob and Rob Professional American Writers said...

How blessed are we who have grown up listening to this brilliant broadcaster. At 86 I'll be happy if I can figure out how to use the remote on the TV let alone be calling ball games on it. Wow. Poetry, indeed. Go Blue, Bob :)

Johnny Walker said...

Ha! I've never watched Baseball before in my life, but that was highly entertaining. How he found things to say, and interesting/funny things, while the game stopped is wonderful.

Classy guy.

Roger Owen Green said...

I'm confused, tho, how another umpire thought he had a better look than the 1B ump, who may well have gotten it right in the first place. It seemed to be caught in the webbing.

Cap'n Bob said...

OK, I'm not entranced by how masterful he is. No excitement and his voice is nearly a monotone. Sorry. Maybe he needs a partner.

Pete Grossman said...

"Jim's gone, so he's spending house money now."

Vin, you *are* the master.

Charles H. Bryan said...

Even Deadspin loves Vin Scully. Maybe more importantly than his abilities, I love how a man who's been announcing baseball for over 60 years supports replay. "They say it'll take too much time? Well, what was THAT?" Mr. Selig, once you've lost Scully, you've lost America. Bring the troops home.

XJill said...

"That is...blankin' fertiziler" Oh, Vin.

James said...

@ Cap N' Bob -- He is monotone, but he's also been the voice of the Dodgers for my entire life. I recognize his nasally tones on the first word.

I'm not sure it's a bad thing. His voice is incredibly recognizable, and often that's more of an asset in radio. There's also something I find soothing about his voice. On rides home from work, I could fall into a ballgame. I never felt beat over the head by the action (which Ken points out is kind of a new growing trend in sports announcing -- I mean, besides hiring Ryan Seacrest).

I do agree with you though, I don't think this illustrates how good Vin is -- there was a lot of dead time.

The nice part is his aside. Many sports announcers tend to fill dead time with random facts of players on the field. I find that tedious. I really liked that he 1) never left the action or the play and 2)(an old timer) pointed out that we have the technology to make a call with precision, the reason why it's not implemented (takes too long), and then pointing out that the "human way" of doing it takes just as long, if not longer.

To each their own I guess.

Mike Barer said...

That is incredible, an 80 plus year old fan who started when the team was in Brooklyn and can still think on his feet.
Is far as the manager flare up, I was in Safeco when Lou Piniella had his legendary tantrum, he was kicked out and kicked dirt several times. He then pull on the base until he finally uprooted it and tossed it. For a manager with an extremely fiery temper, this was the "mother" of all.

VP81955 said...

Mike, an intriguing trivia tidbit: Vin's first broadcast with the Brooklyn Dodgers was a spring training game in 1950 against the Philadelphia Athletics, managed by Connie Mack (in his final year in the dugout). This year, he broadcast Bryce Harper's major-league debut when the Nats were in Los Angeles. Spans the gamut, doesn't it?

Mike McCann said...

@VP8... That ranks with those "hand that shook the hand" revelations. Vin has called games involving Connie Mack (born in 1862 during the Civil War) to Bryce Harper (born 1992 -- yes, 130 years later): the oldest manager to the youngest all-star. Connected by the game's greatest broadcaster.