Thursday, December 25, 2014

A Mommy Dearest Merry Christmas to you all

May your family have as wonderful a Christmas as Joan Crawford's.

9 comments:

Nick Alexander said...

I was watching a string of Christmas-related SNLs this past week, and came across the first Christmas-related Mommie Dearest sketch (season 3), with Jane Curtin as Joan Crawford, Gilda Radner (in top form) as Christina, and Dan Ackroyd, Larraine Newman and Bill Murray [!] as Clark Gable, Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant [!]. It was one of the funniest sketches I had ever seen with the old crew.

It's not on YouTube; it's not on their Christmas compilation DVD; it's only in the full episode.

You had my hopes up; I thought for certain you had that sketch instead.

blinky said...

Spooky! Bet they don't put their new clothes on wire hangers.

normadesmond said...

oh you should see what they
do to poor joan on facebook.

Cap'n Bob said...

It sounded more rehearsed than Mildred Pierce.

Paul said...

Merry Christmas Ken. Thanks for the laughs throughout this year, and every year you're putting out.

TyBeck said...

Merry Christmas, Ken. This is my favorite blog, all year-round. Thank you!

Carson said...

I admit the film is on the corny side, but I think I'm missing the joke somehow.

Daniel said...

After Joan Crawford's death, her adopted daughter Christina wrote a hilariously over-the-top book -- not intended to be such -- titled MOMMIE DEAREST, trashing Crawford as, basically, an abusive, controlling psycho. Whatever credibility the book had was leveled a few years later when MOMMIE DEAREST was turned into a really awful, "so bad it's good" feature film starring Faye Dunaway as Joan.

Both book, film, and Christina -- not to mention Joan Crawford herself -- have receded from public conciousness in recent years.

VP81955 said...

Both book, film, and Christina -- not to mention Joan Crawford herself -- have receded from public conciousness in recent years.

The first three deservedly have fallen out of the public consciousness (in her autobiography, Myrna Loy -- one of the most respected stars in the industry -- lambasted Christina), but Joan Crawford herself was a pretty good actress, arguably the consummate flapper in the 1920s (Colleen Moore and Louise Brooks fans understandably will disagree), and a charismatic, ethereal star during the 1930s.

I can't call her one of my favorite actresses for the simple reason that she lacked the deftness for comedy, but the Crawford of the '30s deserved all the accolades she got. It wasn't until after World War II, when her features became more severe and her style more exaggerated, that Joan became a target for camp.

Had Crawford died at about the same time Carole Lombard did (1942), her legacy would be considerably different. (And to prove Joan was no monster, after Carole died, Crawford took over her role in "They All Kissed The Bride," a boss-lady comedy better suited for Rosalind Russell than either Crawford or Lombard, and donated her $100,000 salary to the Red Cross, firing her agent after he took his share of the cut.)