Tuesday, August 04, 2009

Boycott the Emmys

If the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences isn’t the dumbest organization in Hollywood they have to be in the top two. Here’s their latest moronic move:

In an effort to improve ratings for their Emmy cast they’ve decided to streamline the show and no longer give all writing awards on the live broadcast. They’ll be given earlier and snippets of the acceptance speeches will air on the show.

This is the same genius Board of Directors who last year decided to let five reality show hosts emcee and ad lib for ten of the most excruciating and embarrassing minutes in the history of television. Who needs writers when you have Heidi Klum and funnyman Jeff Probst? Yes, the ratings were deplorable but do you think it just might have been because of the horrendous hosts? And an ill-conceived tribute to MASH that featured not the cast of MASH but Kathy Griffin?

Not to mention that pathetic LAUGH-IN sketch. If you’re trying to draw a younger audience, that’s how you do it -- by reprising a show that no one under 45 has ever heard of.

Yeah, the writers’ awards were what caused the horrific ratings.

Hey, here’s a novel idea! Present the goddamn commemorative awards off the air. Edit Tommy Smothers’ blathering speech. Let the writers who actually won something have their one moment in the sun.

Maybe if the director of the Emmys (who coincidentally just happened to win an Emmy) didn’t rattle on for five minutes during his own acceptance speech there would have been more time.

Another novel idea: You want to streamline the show? Then why ADD categories? Reality Show host, Reality show: competition, Reality Show: non competition. That’s excellence? That’s going to attract viewers? Pitting the great Heidi Klum against the magnetic Phil Keoghan? Imagine in the old days telling Paddy Chayefsky he couldn't accept his Emmy live on the air because they needed time for Soupy Sales to get his.

They've also padded the number of nominees in some cases. That way more network shows that Joe Lunch Pail has heard of get included. Isn't the point to recognize the best shows, not the most promoted?

There is a letter of protest that has been submitted to the Academy signed by practically every showrunner in television. Furthermore, omitting two writing categories from the live broadcast violates a longstanding WGA agreement with the ATAS.

But the message the Academy is sending is clear. Writing is not considered important enough to be honored on the national broadcast. Writers haven’t made a significant enough contribution; certainly not as significant as reality show hosts. It’s a huge slap in the face. Not to mention the ATAS is shortchanging the only winners who can really put three sentences together.

Last year’s show was an unmitigated disaster. It deserved the worst ratings ever. The television industry can’t even put on a decent show that honors television. But maybe, just maybe, the problem was that it was poorly conceived.

And POORLY WRITTEN!!

How vital are scribes? Remember what happened when we boycotted the Golden Globes? Talk about bad ratings -- how about NO ratings?

I join the WGA in urging the Television Academy to reconsider this misguided and insulting decision.

55 comments :

Annie said...

Omg I totally agree with you. Without writers, there would be no TV. At all. Reality shows are a waste of time, in my opinion. They are just ways for rich people to make more money, or someone who did something really stupid to get their own tv show. I hope they come to their senses...

Max Clarke said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Max Clarke said...

Inept.

Reminds me of what a writer and show runner for Everybody Loves Raymond said about a stupid network decision: as you ponder what they've said, you have to hold your head a certain way to keep your brains from running out through your ear.

Rob said...

Ken, my understanding is that Katherine Heigl would not agree to be a part of television anymore if these unnecessary ciphers known as writers weren't excluded from the telecast. Rumor has it that she saw the list of nominees for sitcoms and said, "I know funny, and these aren't funny." She then took only an hour for lunch, out of consideration for the crew.

But, to be fair, which would you rather have, a witty and literate speech by a writer, or Ryan Seacrest accepting an award and crediting his success to Simon's tight T-shirts? Honestly, no contest.

WV -- Untaxegi -- What Italian Teabaggers say at their protests.

WV (after the first failed) Bervatam -- How a dyslexic repeats something back to you word for word.

Craig said...

I've noticed when a show is good the actors get the credit, but when it is bad they blame the writers.

I've also noticed that at award shows the writers are sitting WAY in the back, possibly out in the parking lot?

The Milner Coupe said...

Mr. Levine,
If you tilt your head, squint your eyes, and take a very deep breath... you can almost take this moronic act as a compliment. During television's (ie society's)nosedive toward obsolescence, why should writers escape a bullit? One by one all the qualities that made our culture so great are being eliminated so that we can pander to and ultimately control the lowest common denominator.

Good writers are smart. Television is getting D-U-M-B. Why celebrate intelligence?

The Emmys? I won't be watching. And maybe some of the writers who are forced to accept their awards on the back porch can refuse to participate? It'd take balls but would not go un-noticed.

Sorry, and good luck.

bevo said...

As an non-obviously industry type, I do not care about any of the awards shows. If they never broadcast another show, then I will not loose a moments sleep.

Pay them money when they are good instead of giving them a trophy.

Although, how come there is no awards channel similar to Sleuth, Current, and other stuff numbered in the 300s on my satellite box? Who would not want to watch the 1978 Academy Awards show? It works for ESPN Classic. It could work for awards shows. Think NFL Network except for statues.

I'll take my royalty check in the form of a lifetime achievement award. Thank you.

Jewlsdeluxe said...

Frankly the writers' speeches are one of the reasons I'll watch an awards show. I want to see what they will say and hope it's good. I expect nothing short of greatness. I've been delighted and disappointed. I can't remember who it was but on the Academy Awards a couple of years ago one writer read a list of names for his speech. Blah. That said, I didn't watch last year's Emmys because I couldn't bear to put myself through that torture when I read what was planned. This year sounds just as bad. How dare they cut the writers' awards from the live telecast!

Melody said...

I'm not a writer or an actor or in any way involved in the making of a TV show or movie. But I do know what I like. And what I like is a well-written show with engaging actors that makes the watcher (me!)want to continue watching.

No, I do not like the so-called
"reality" shows (in quotes because there is nothing "real" about them). It makes me ill that so many of the shows on the air are in this group. And more are being added all the time. Yes, I know they are relatively cheap to produce. And obviously I'm in a minority because they get good enough ratings. At least good enough ratings to be allowed to continue to breed in some dark corner somewhere.

Taking the writers awards off primetime for the Emmys and putting all the "reality" awards on there is ridiculous. But I guess that they think "reality" awards will draw viewers. Don't think so! I'll admit to being torn, though. I was considering watching the show this year because of a much better choice for host. But I don't know if I can stomach that many reality awards.

Anonymous said...

As someone who worked on the show last year, and in defense of the producer and writers, that opening was entirely the misguided idea of the hosts, primarily the one whose initials are Howie Mandel.

The mystery to me was why the producer didn't stop it, but it's certainly possible he tried as was told to f*ck off. If you ever want a thankless job try producing a live award show like The Emmys where temperamental talent can hold you hostage and refuse to go on unless you let them do it "their" way. The year before the producer basically spent the first hour of the show backstage convincing a diva from the past that her prepared remarks for a tribute were inappropriate (they were) and risking that a highly publicized reunion would not materialize on stage.

The Emmys are facing a real dilemma; if awards aren't based on excellence they compromise the integrity of the ceremony. But an awards ceremony celebrating the excellence of niche cable shows is not going to draw sufficient ratings to survive.

It's ironic that in the early days of cable (and the Fox Network) they craved the mark of excellence the Emmys represented and couldn't wait to be part of them. Now "cable" (and Fox) may be downfall of the Emmys. Cable because the quality of its original programming generally outclasses the FCC hamstrung broadcast television product, and Fox because it became the launching pad for reality television.

What they need to do is separate broadcast nominees from cable shows. Perhaps a "Best Show That Could Be Produced Without Offending The Sensibilities of a 5 Year Old - Drama"

I think it's hard to fault them for wanting to winnow down the number of prime time awards, presenting 28 awards in three hours is insane, but it's a mistake to single out the writers categories. First because the writers variety show staff nomination packages are generally the highlight of the show, and second, writers tend to deliver the more literate and entertaining acceptance speeches. A more equitable solution would be to take a couple from all the disciplines so they could share the pain.

Okay, I can see the stage manager waiving me off, so my time is up.

Cap'n Bob said...

I agree with everything you said, Ken. Well, I have to admit I'd rather watch Soupy Sales get an Emmy than Paddy Chayefsky if I had to choose between the two. I guess my low brow is showing.

bruce miller said...

leaving writers out of the broadcast sort of loses the reason for the show in the first place. If the Academy wants to do a variety show with well known TV stars, let them do that.....just don't call it an awards show. As a composer, me and my colleagues have felt this snub forever. In the art of music composition, years of training, and abuse that composers take on a constant basis, it's extremely frustrating to have been ignored by so many for so long. Worse yet is to be treated as "incidental" compared to hairstylists, wardrobe and several other important crafts, yet lack the training and years of commitment and sacrifice that composers must commit to. Check out the Oscars.......composers are always treated with the respect they've earned and deserve. Sorry to make it personal, but among the talented cadre of career music creators, it doesn't get much more personal.

Ben Scripps said...

For the record, I'm 36 and have heard of "Laugh-In."

That's the show with the Coneheads, right?

Rory L. Aronsky said...

That's the show with the Coneheads, right?

No, I think that's "The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour." :insert winky face here:

Ray Richmond said...

Ken:

Right on the money as usual, sir. Let's remember, this is the same TV Academy that has NEVER found a way to nominate "The Simpsons" for outstanding comedy series. The producers finally gave up and hightailed it to the animated series category, where they've won several times. But for one of the classic comedies in TV history to never merit so much as a nomination in the only category that matters is a singular travesty.

Then again, as you aptly point out, last year's opening 10 minutes with reality producers made the Oscar "Snow White" debacle look like "Citizen Kane." I guess this is the kind of sterling entertainment Don Mischer is referring to.

The unacknowledged elephant in this particular room is the lack of interest young adults have in the awards shows with the longest traditions (Oscars-Emmys-Grammys). They see these as their parents' extravaganzas, the VMAs as their own. I don't think keeping a couple of victorious writers muzzled is likely to turn this tide. Ergo, they might as well honor everyone the way they should be honored (writers included), allow the Emmycast to migrate to HBO (where ratings matter far less) and call it a night.

Given how much sense this makes, you can bet dollars to d'oh!-nuts it'll never happen

some guy said...

you're right...

but..

8 awards are being moved (two each from writers, directors, producers and actors)...

no one is happy...

and the producers claim they will air the speeches in their entirety...

still maybe a horrid idea given that the space freed up is for hose nozzle reality clowns, but a more shared and inclusive fuck you, if you will..

Dhppy said...

I can't wait to be a working writer so I can at least get paid to be mistreated.

Anonymous said...

If what Anonymous says is true, Howie Mandel should only be allowed to speak if the words provided are from John Masius or the St. Elsewhere writers.

word of the day: Lionedu. Archie Bunker wouldn't be cultured enough to send Lionel off this way.

Willy B. Good said...

I just pray the writers will be replaced by something worthwhile like Katherine Heigl giving a moving tribute to the characters who inspired her to act as a child, Arnold Jackson and Arnold Ziffel.

playfull said...

Why not get rid of all the old fashioned ‘talent’ based awards and replace them with more relevant and contemporary ones – ‘The Katherine Heigl stealth joke award’ – ‘The Morgan Freeman reaches out to the young award’...

Rob said...

I have always been surprised at the number of people who follow every "reality" show as though it were the world's best soap opera. With the exception of perhaps "The Biggest Loser" and "Amazing Race", is there a reality competition show out there that doesn't make you feel like you need to scrub yourself with antibacterial soap and a Brillo Pad when you're done watching?

I cannot imagine any reality TV moment that stacks up with my favorite moments from sitcoms and television drama.

Anonymous said...

I guess somebody didn't get nominated this year, Ken.

I'm joking of course. Ken has never been nominated.

See, you Anonymous fucks? THAT'S how you do a burn AND I'm leaving a fucking name.

CrackerJacker said...

I think this is nothing more than middle-management run amok. Not that I have much faith in any level of management at either the Film or TV Academy. They've really just shown their hand, at again, lowering the imaginary standards of excellence we're supposed to pretend they have.

Unless the Emmys or the Oscars(Or any award bestowed by private voting authority), can keep up the pretense that they know what they're doing, and on some level the viewer can think "Oh, I see what they did there, maybe they gave the award to the right one", then they have no chance. Last year was a bad mis-step, mostly because when you want a host, you want someone to keep things moving. You don't want people whose current career consists of lifelessly standing in front of a camera, with all the charm and excitement of your average Emmy nominee announcer, because they only gum up proceedings. The reality experiment was awful, but also crazy - the producers thought they could do a good show if they brought everything they liked about reality tv....but left out the only reason anybody watches them; The contestants/public.

I don't know. But the time seems to be coming when awards shows like the Emmys, who struggle to find relevance or an audience and follow that up with madcap diluting of the ceremony.....It's going to be the case that people will only watch it via an interactive service that allows them to filter out the "dross", instead of relying on the producers of the telecast to make shows good. Instead, they make shows that cut off or edit speeches out for time, do "in memoriam" features where all you can see is how fabulous Queen Latifah looks tonight, let people who aren't interesting or funny ad-lib, or sacrifice one part of their audience to try to make another part of the audience love them(See: Emmys "Laugh-In" skit).

But keep the "In Memoriam" segments. I love them. Reminds me of the happy memories that people gave me. Except the agents who show up there. I'm not saying they shouldn't be in the feature, but I just don't know who they are.

Oh and a final thing. I don't think speeches should be edited or rushed off stage by music - at least not in the current manner. I hear the music for the people on stage after not much time has passed since their asses left their seats, and all it makes me want to do is switch off. Not because of the speeches, but because the rush the show is in disrespects the sincerity of authority that these things need to retain. An aura of lustre, a shiny chandelier, an elegant fountain....something to take your eyes from the travesties that the academy voters committed throughout the rest of the house this year. So if you don't like the speeches, drink a lot so you can take regular, extended bathroom breaks.

Joe said...

My worry is not that this is a morbidly idiotic decision (it is) but that it is a decision that offers ringing evidence about a morbidly idiotic mindset.

Oy.

Just...oy.

Blaze said...

When I first heard that in the once-upon-a-time, the Oscars were awarded at a private banquet, my reaction was "Why don't they still do that??"

Televising Oscars-Emmys-whatever was the first step to "reality television". It's a kids' piano recital with expensive clothing. I only have a mild curiosity in reading the results the next day.

Doktor Frank Doe said...

And with you permission Ken, pasting this blog into an email and sending it to ALL on my/our address books?

Let's get this word out fast

I for one am sick of the stupid running the world!

Dok F. Doe

Anonymous said...

The Emmys jumped the shark long ago.

When seemingly everyone in every aspect of the business gets nominated for everything - and they hand out, what, 500 statues a year? - the award tends to lose its significance.

They should be renamed "The Egos".

blogward said...

Television and Academy. Two words that don't belong together somehow. Like McDonalds and University.

Michael Green said...

Not having watched the Emmy Awards in years, I will have no problem being part of a boycott. But I have to say, the posters who have said writers should be pleased not to be associated with that prime-time dreck do have a point.

Anonymous said...

"Isn't the point to recognize the best shows, not the most promoted?"


The point of the Emmy telecast is to get ratings, so honoring shows that the public actually likes and watches is kind of important. The industry may get wet over 30 ROCK but the viewers seem to have figured out that clever is not the same thing as funny.

If the highest goal in television is to create a well done niche show that appeals to a tiny niche audience, go back to giving the awards away at an untelevised banquet.

Mike

Karen from Mentor said...

I hate reality tv. And it seems like anything that is smart and funny and has good writing that I LOVE gets cancelled anyway...

I'll boycott the emmy's Ken.
I'll even throw a shoe through my tv if you want.
(I'll just pause it on a photo of Bush first)

Bob M. said...

I won't watch the Emmy's without writers. I'm still waiting for a televised Writer's Award show. I'd watch it in a heartbeat. So would a couple of million other folks. By the way, I'd love to see Soupy Sales get an Emmy. When he told a joke, it didn't matter how funny it was. Just having Soupy tell it would have you laughing long before the punch line.

Michael, Los Angeles said...

THE BOTTOM LINE - Anybody who has ever written knows it is one of the most difficult things to do and without words there would be nothing for the actor to say. In spite of that, the truth is, the audience does not know who the writers are and they don't care. Audiences want to see the faces they see on television. We all know this. Reality is hot. Certain dramas are hot. Some sitcoms are hot. In a perfect world, the "hottest" stars would win all the awards. That would give you the biggest ratings. Writers have to accept that we are the mules behind the scenes and accept our paychecks gratefully. As for last years Emmy telecast, you can't blame the talent, you can only blame the Producers. It's their job to "produce" and I assume that is why there are new producers this year.

Lisa said...

Really great comments, everyone. I agree. But what do we do now?
**sigh**
Beers anyone?
Heigl's buying.

Howard Hoffman said...

It's tragic. All the gears that make a show work - the actors AND the creative and construction crews - are what determines the quality of a show.

Over the past few years, the crew has been more and more marginalized...not just at the Emmys but in the show credits. Networks keep pushing their names more and more off the screen when the credits roll, making them practically unreadable.

I hope my fellow actors could take the time to thank these people who made them look so good when they accept, instead of shoutouts to their entourages. If writers are left out of the telecast, shout their names from the rafters in protest. Show you care.

TVslogger said...

A drama perspective: I work in the drama (as opposed to comedy, factual or 'entertainment') studios of a UK subsidiary of a major TV multinational. The CEO did a pep talk in April, all about the downturn 'n all, and how advertising has fallen off a cliff. A great speaker, and he did say he was genuinely optimistic, given the worldwide performance of the shows said multinational makes, about how things would turn out. Then he did the slideshow showing us drama bods what amazing figures the company's current shows were getting across the world, and the exciting new shows in the pipeline. Guessed it yet? Every one a reality format. Every single one.

Tom Quigley said...

Ken, you and every other writer should do what Robert Riskind did to Frank Capra once, when Capra did an interview with a reporter and talked about "The Capra Touch" in his films without ever mentioning that Riskind wrote the scripts for some of his best-loved movies. He sent Capra 90 blank pages double-bound with brads and and a note saying "Frank: Try putting 'The Capra Touch' on this."

I imagine if the academy was inundated with a few hundred packets of 45 to 50 blank pages bound together with a note that read "Let's see you give an award to any other category that can produce a show with this," maybe they'd realize what idiots they are -- but I doubt it -- even while they're making notes about their own script....

J.J. said...

Somebody should write or record this little abnormally in the annals of Academy history, according to one internet news... err... inside Hollywood gossip... oh, okay, it was Nikki Fincke... even the DGA (the effing DGA!) agrees dumping the writers from the Emmy broadcast is a dumb idea...

I think the world's end can't be far behind.

Kirk said...

Audiences don't know that somebody sits down and writes LOST, SCRUBS, THE OFFICE, 30 ROCK, GRAY'S ANATOMY, MONK, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA, SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE, etc. They think the actors make it up as they go along.

--Sunset Boulevard (updated)

jackscribe said...

I'm not "industry" but completely agree with the academy diss. Reality TV is not only an embarrassment, but the shows have created a mindset that gives bad behavior a green light. If I'm not out and about, I now entertain myself the old fashioned way...I read.

Brian Scully said...

I'll tell you what has always pissed me off about the Emmys is that all decisions about who qualifies for an Emmy or which categories are televised, are all made by moron Emmy execs who could not qualify to even be a member of the Emmys... they are hired hacks who are suddenly making decisions on how creative people are treated. They should keep their mouths shut and collect their phony/baloney paychecks.

Unknown said...

Might reality shows be peaking, like Westerns, wrestling, etc. in their turn?

Props to Bob M. and Soupy.

Verification Word:

Spagrim -new from Chef Boyardee.

A. Buck Short said...

Some people just know good writing when they see it. Others learn by experience:

Solid, effective writing:
“Honey, I’m off on a ‘quick trip to North Korea’ to pick up women. Miss ya’.”
-- Bill.

Not so much:
“Honey, I’m out for a stroll on the Appalachian Trail. Be home soon. Con todo mi cariƱo.
-- Guillermo.

MATTHEW ROSE said...

Hi Ken,

Just discovered your blog. I was looking for information on residual payments and found your site.

I am normally based in Paris, France and rarely watch TV, but now that I'm visiting and seeing lots of TV, it is very clear that the best shows are those written, edited, rewritten, edited and whittled down to poetry. Most stuff on tv is nonsense...

I'll come back to visit... be good.

Best,

MATTHEW ROSE

Joe said...

Tom,
The way their minds work, if you sent them 90 blank pages you'd STILL get notes.

Joey H said...

I'm with Great Big Radio Guy regarding the credits and the general disrespect for everyone who contributes to a show and isn't a big enough cheese to be in the opening credits. I hate it when closing credits are squeezed beyond any recognition.

David K. M. Klaus said...

In his younger days, Harlan Ellison would've gone down to the Academy offices and knocked heads until people came to their senses. Maybe he still will, he certainly was on the line during the strike from what I've read, even though he doesn't write much for television these days.

They still can't take away my memory of the best Emmy moment I ever saw, in 1994 when they tried to musically play Fyvush Finkel off the stage of the Pasadena Auditorium after he received his award and he said, "I've waited 51 years to stand up here, and you're not forcing me off early!"

Bless him, for all those who've been short-changed in what should have been their crowning moments.

-bee said...

Maybe if they change the name of the writing awards to the 'executive' producer' awards, they'll be put back in the live part of the show.

The CEOs of the corporations that buy advertising time would HATE to think their own kind were being dissed.

Anonymous said...

Re: adding new categories. I made the same point on Twitter. An Academy board member was deployed yesterday, replying to one and all who were protesting by writing #emmysfail on their tweets. He was being quite the bully so I looked him up. Guy's an interactive tv producer, whatever that means, who got himself on the TV Academy board, not before championing the addition of a new Emmy category 'best interactive tv' or something. And I got this thru his Linkedin, where he boasted about it. And now he comes batting around about trying to streamline the show? C'mon. The balls!

Ben said...

The writing categories are the ones that I consider to be the benchmark Emmy awards. Great actors can make anything better; the same with directors. However, if I want to figure out what was the best episode of comedy or drama for the year, I look at the writing category.

Unknown said...

Ken, great idea about pretaping the commemorative awards.

Ultimately, every peer group stands ready to raise a fuss over what ultimately amounts to America at large as an invisible walk to the stage.

As a reality tv guy who does a lot of compression-of-time for a living, I humbly suggest that ATAS quietly start the awards an hour before broadcast and have an editing team pull up the time expended on those long strolls to the stage. Names are announced, an oh-my-God reaction is shown, we cut away to a couple of non-involved celebrity faces smiling/applauding and then return to that final 3 seconds as everyone gathers around the mic and the speech begins.

Spread that banked time across twentysomething awards and there's a fast-moving two hours and ten minutes of show where every peer group looks like they've been treated equally.

Unknown said...

By the way, I was no fan of the reality host mess last year as their attempt to go unscripted pretty much just proved they needed their writers (I mean, host copy guys / story producers / invisible whatevers).

While I'm at it, let me say to the anti-reality folks that there's a ton of hastily-made junk in the genre, but just as with scripted, the good stuff is... well... good stuff. For every I'M A CELEBRITY, GET ME OUT OF HERE, there's something outstanding and worthy of honor, like Bourdain's NO RESERVATIONS.

Emmys09 said...

The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences would like to clear up the miscommunication about what time-shifting means and reiterate our statement that no awards are to be dropped the evening of 61st Primetime Emmy Awards Telecast, Sunday September 20th 8/7c on CBS.

"We're just trying to edit down the standing and the hugging...and the walking down the aisle," said host and star of How I Met Your Mother, Neil Patrick Harris of the categories affected including, Directing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Series, Directing for a Miniseries or a Movie, Writing for a Drama Series, Writing for a Miniseries or a Movie, Made for Television Movie, Miniseries, Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie and Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie.
None of the eight awards presentations or acceptance speeches were ever slated to be dropped from the show, despite misinformation concerning cuts circulating across news and various web channels. These awards will be presented in front of the entire Primetime Emmy audience of nominees and television professionals in full production conditions, while being tightened to eliminate the time award recipients walk down the aisles to the stage, up the steps and wait for their winning teammates to assemble on stage. These awards will air in the final half of the telecast, providing sufficient time to edit and highlight spontaneous remarks and actions with dramatic and comic impact.

Don Mischer, the show’s Executive Producer, says, “The writers' speeches are some of the best ones of the night. So we'll be able to highlight them more.”

Anonymous said...

didn't the director accept the award from the directing room, and cued his own "STFU" music during the speech last year? I thought that was pretty classic

Outstanding Writing said...

Maybe they all need to learn more about outstanding writing!