Saturday, July 06, 2013

My first "dirty" movie

Here's another excerpt from my book, THE ME GENERATION... BY ME (GROWING UP IN THE '60s).  You can order it (or write a glowing review, which would really be appreciated) here. 

I had just turned 16.
One day I read in the paper that a new French movie was opening called THE GAME IS OVER. The review mentioned that Jane Fonda starred and was naked in quite a few scenes. This I HAD to see!

It was only playing at one art theater on La Brea in Hollywood. Damn! Why couldn’t it be at the Baronet (the local art theater that showed Fellini films to empty seats)?

I knew mom and dad wouldn’t let me borrow the car to see Jane Fonda’s vagina on the big screen and besides, it was only playing “over the hill” (anything not in the San Fernando Valley was considered "over the hill". But when you're nervous about driving that "hill" might as well have been the Andes).

So I convinced Lester Nafybal who worked with me at Wallichs Music City and was a grown up at 19 to take me in exchange for gas, dinner, and tickets.

Ohmygod!

If God can create a creature like this and in His divine mercy allow me to see her naked on a diving board, then He must truly exist.

For several days after I walked with a swagger. Yes, I was still a virgin and no, that wasn’t about to change anytime soon – but I was different, changed. I had become a man. I had seen a French movie.

8 comments:

Vince said...

Ken,
I grew up outside of Buffalo, NY, and if we adjusted the TV antenna the right way we could pick up a few Canadian channels, which showed their late movies uncut. (This was long before cable TV.) I used to stay up late on Saturday nights and watch whatever they were showing, and one night I stumbled onto The Game is Over. I had the same reaction as you, although I don't remember it being quite as explicit as you describe. But I certainly did have that "I'm prepared to die now" feeling after seeing Jane!

Scooter Schechtman said...

Was this "La Curee"? When I was a strapping young doper I hunted for the soundtrack album because it was reputed to contain some Arthur Brown songs...

Mike said...

@Scooter Schechtman:
The Arthur Brown Set: Don't Tell Me and Baby You Know What You're Doing (1966).
Bonus: Arthur Brown with the Diamonds: You Don't Know (1965).

Janet said...

Oh you boys....

MikeBo said...

I don't remember this one, but I still try to check out "Barbarella" if I see it listed. And don't forget her saxophone scene in "Hurry Sundown."

Barry Traylor said...

Ken, this is a Friday question that I hope you have an answer for. Why do they use type casting when choosing an actor for a part that requires the actor to play a villain in disguise pretending to be a good person when that is all they have played in the past? It then is hardly a surprise to the the viewer when the character shows his or her true colors.
It would be so nice if they would cast against type once in awhile to provide more of a surprise.

Anonymous said...

"Wallichs Music City"!?! OK, if you drop a Pacific Stereo reference, I'm never reading this thing again.

Mike said...

Hey, I thought it was art that is essential to the film?

You mean the joke really is on the actresses, and Seth McFarlane's song was right(Someone reviewed it as terrible for implying the actresses were not engaged in art and the jokes on them)?