Saturday, January 25, 2014

Fiddler on the Roof Medley -- by the Osmond Brothers

This you've GOT to see.  That's all I've got to say.

27 comments:

Mitchell Hundred said...

GPOY.

Mike said...

I've always said this: Unlike the Jews, it's the Mormons that truly understand the meaning of persecution.

Chester said...

To quote Brigham Young... "Oi vey!"

Roseann said...

I couldn't watch…….but you knew that didn't you, Ken.

Mike McCann said...

If this had been The Lettermen, most of us would have said, "Nice." If it had been Jay & Americans, fans would have gone, "Brilliant!"

But the guys with the overly large smiles and polyester suits with the mega-lapels are just tacky, no matter how good the harmonies are.

Janet said...

It's the choreography that sells it.

AlaskaRay said...

Where's Marie when you need her... a perfect Tzeitel.

Canda said...

I doubt Zero Mostel ever had pre-teen girls screaming when he sang, "Rich Man".

While undoubtedly everyone will see this as something easy to mock, I actually applaud them for honoring "Fiddler". The Osmonds are religious, and appreciate religious tradition. Compare that to the message the Justin Biebers of the world are sending to teenagers.

Chris said...

If Jerry Robbins is in hell--as many of those who worked with him certainly hope--then perhaps this is on a continual loop for him to watch.

Cap'n Bob said...

I made it half way through, mostly because I was stunned at how bad this was and couldn't move.

afg1 said...

Hey, thank you for finding something of the Osmonds that I'd never seen before!

The costumes and choreography are typical of their act at the time. Ignore those if you must, but do listen. Wonderful voices and no Auto-Tune!

Steve McLean said...

I'd pay to see them faceoff against The New Christy Minstrels doing "I Loves You Porgy"

Victor Velasco said...

When you can find bagels in Salt Lake City, don't ask for lox cause they'll send you to a hardware store

RCP said...

In this case, the girls were screaming in horror.

Chase said...

Who are the Osmond Brothers?

Carson said...

The aftermath of having watched it is much like waking from a bizarre dream after eating a burrito too close to bedtime. I feel amused, confounded, and ever so slightly nauseas.

Barry Traylor said...

Do you have an answer for why the "The Butler" needed 39 producers. Seems a bit excessive to me at least.

DBenson said...

I have vague memories of Dick Van Dyke doing a swingin' version of "If I Were a Rich Man" on some variety show. Being a mere lad, I'd never heard of "Fiddler on the Roof" and took it at face value as an odd comedy song by a business-suited WASP.

Once upon a time it was pretty standard practice to strip songs of context for pop consumption. Thus you'd get Frank Sinatra in a tux singing "Old Man River," beauty contestants offering "Being Alive" as a loungey love song, and little kids unironically belting "Let Me Entertain You" at amateur theater auditions (complete with unironic stage mothers cuing them).

Movie and even Broadway musicals often included songs that seemed intentionally designed to be lifted out and plugged. The lyrics didn't bind them to a story; the tunes would lend themselves to pop treatments.

Don't know if the movie had come out by the time they did this, but figure people knew about "Fiddler on the Roof". But perhaps the public was still so used to bizarre covers they didn't react. And the Osmonds themselves, who clearly lavished some time and care on this, never registered the disconnect.

Butch Cassidy said...

Perfect for the time, there's nothing wrong w/this number. The Osmonds do far more positive things than most of their peers. Mock them if you must, it merely shows how small you are. Not that anyone cares!

Anonymous said...

Your dad's version of "Snatch Maker" was much, much better in "Piddler on the Roof". I was told the Morman's love the Jews, we are the chosen people, when I interviewd for a job at Bonnivlle Broadcasting, then owners of KBIG Radio here in L.A. Also my Mom was born in Salt Lake City making her a gentile.

craig m said...

Tevye wakes from his dream and turns to his wife, but as he is about to recount his nightmare, he realizes it might be better to just go back to sleep.

cSmith said...

Well, Mormons call non-Mormons "gentiles". Does that count?

Steven Gordon said...

You do realize that Mormons actually (and oddly) consider themselves to be THE lost tribe of Israel that is spoken of ...without understanding that it was just a poets term and that there really wasn't a tribe that actually got lost somewhere...much less in South America

404 said...

Steven, if I remember correctly, the lost tribes (plural) refer to the ten tribes of Israel that were captured and taken away when Israel was overrun by some empire--Persians? Assyrians?--I don't remember. The people in those ten tribes were never heard from again, and only the two tribes that lived in the southern land of Judah remained. It is though that the people of the ten lost tribes just eventually assimilated into the population of their surroundings. So yes, there were really lost tribes, it wasn't just a poetical metaphor.

Pete Grossman said...

Grammy worthy!

Later, the boys retired to the craft services table and consumed ham sandwiches with milk.

McAlvie said...

Okay, it's weird watching that - what is it, 35 years later? But everything done in the 70s looks cheesy, so I'm cutting them a break on this one. They had talent, they did it respectfully, and the songs are classic and they probably introduced a generation to FOTR that was otherwise ignorant.

I shudder to think what today's teen heartthrobs would do to it.

Anonymous said...

Holy kreplach